Concrete Poetry with Jonathan Meades

Joy Behold, It’s Meades-Time.

Bunkers, Brutalism and Bloodymindedness: Concrete Poetry with Jonathan Meades

Bunkers, Brutalism and Bloodymindedness: Concrete Poetry with Jonathan Meades

1
Two-part documentary in which Jonathan Meades makes the case for 20th-century concrete Brutalist architecture in an homage to a style that he sees a brave, bold and bloody-minded. Tracing its precursors to the once-hated Victorian edifices described as Modern Gothic and before that to the unapologetic baroque visions created by John Vanbrugh, as well as the martial architecture of World War II, Meades celebrates the emergence of the Brutalist spirit in his usual provocative and incisive style. Never pulling his punches, Meades praises a moment in architecture he considers sublime and decries its detractors.

2
Second of a two-part documentary in which Jonathan Meades makes the case for 20th-century concrete Brutalist architecture, which is once again being appreciated by a younger generation. Focusing initially on the massive influence of Le Corbusier’s post-war work, he reclaims the reputation of buildings that, once much maligned, he argues stood for optimism and grandeur. Delivered in his signature provocative and confrontational manner, Meades’s film draws on extraordinary buildings from all over Europe in a lavish, sometimes surreal, visual collage

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03w7b7x

Broadcast Times

Bunkers, Brutalism and Bloodymindedness: Concrete Poetry with Jonathan Meades Episode 1 (of 2)
BBC Four, Sunday 16th February at 21.00.
Repeated Thursday 20th February at 00:40.

Bunkers, Brutalism and Bloodymindedness: Concrete Poetry with Jonathan Meades Episode 2 (of 2)
BBC Four, Sunday, 23rd February 2014 at 21.00.
Repeated Thursday 27th Feb 2014 at 01.40.

Also, don’t forget BBC iPlayer will let you view the programmes online for a designated time thereafter.

The incredible hulks: Jonathan Meades’ A-Z of brutalism

Habitat 67 in Montreal, by Moshe Safdie. Photograph: UIG via Getty Images

Habitat 67 in Montreal, by Moshe Safdie. Photograph: UIG via Getty Images

“It was mocked and misunderstood. But it produced some of the most sublime, awe-inspiring buildings on the planet. Jonathan Meades, maker of a new TV series about brutalism, gives his A-Z” Continue reading at The Guardian

And Another Thing…

I was going to launch into my usual media diatribe, but I changed my mind.
And then I changed my mind again.

Clean that dust-collecting box in the corner of the room, you stuck-in-the-past television-users, it’s that time of year again where one can expect to be spoken to like the adult one has possibly worked hard to educate one’s self to be.

It’s so, so regrettable that so little mainstream media treats us in the way Jonathan Meades does; as Peter Ackroyd does; as Adam Curtis does; as Brian Sewell does. Even venerable David Attenborough has succumbed to a more stylised form of presentation these days – particularly when working alongside Sky TV, though in practice he would have to go a long, long way to significantly blot his copy book. Prof Cox too is easily led by the play-it-safe committee-led stylings of the BBC. C’est la vie. I suppose.

‘Ah, but was it ever thus?’ It’s never a good idea to eulogise the past into perfection, but tinted spectacles aside it was surely never this bland? Perhaps it’s simply the natural order of things that every once and a while evolution becomes bored with all that it has to offer and fetches itself off to bed to spend a few decades surrounded by nymphs proffering endless baskets of fruit and wine and to engage in proclivities most unspoken. And anyway, who am I to complain? Evolution? Hardest job in the world mate!

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About domestic empire

Writer, philosopher, humourist, musician, photographer, supporter of human rights, animal welfare, owner/operator of a small industrial beard and a whisker shy of talented.
This entry was posted in Documentary, Television and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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