Goodbye To WhatsApp!

Yes It’s Time To Ditch WhatsApp!

WhatsApp logo

And it’s goodbye to WhatsApp!

Following today’s announcement that WhatsApp plans to “..begin sharing more data with Facebook and will start letting some companies send messages to users.”, it’s high-time to look elsewhere and ditch WhatsApp for good.

Facebook bought the messaging app WhatsApp for $19bn (£11.4bn) in 2014.

As of February 2016, WhatsApp had a user base of one billion, so that’s a lot of people to spam with useless crap they don’t need.

“When WhatsApp was acquired by Facebook it was able to reassure users that it would remain independent,” said Pamela Clark-Dickson, principal analyst at Ovum, an independent analyst and consultancy firm based in London.

“Now it’s giving Facebook phone numbers – some might say that’s a betrayal of trust. In a small way, it has gone back on what it said it wouldn’t do.”

There is an opt-out procedure, but can we trust facebook?

UPDATE:
Whatsapp investigated by Government over Facebook data sharing (independent.co.uk)

Alternatives

Here, try Open Source. It’s free, and better for you.
And don’t forget kids, Never trust The Man.

Android Open Source alternatives for WhatsApp at Alternativeto.net
http://alternativeto.net/software/whatsapp/?license=opensource&platform=android

Iphone Open Source alternatives for WhatsApp at Alternativeto.net
http://alternativeto.net/software/whatsapp/?license=opensource&platform=iphone

Ref:

WhatsApp users to receive adverts (BBC)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-37184651

How do I choose not to share my account information with Facebook to improve my Facebook ads and products experiences? (whatsapp.com)
https://www.whatsapp.com/faq/general/26000016

Whatsapp (Wikipedia)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whatsapp

Open Source (Wikipedia)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open-source_software

Posted in Business, Software | Tagged , , , ,

The Human Cost of Conflict Palm Oil

What’s really in that snack food? Too frequently, the answer is palm oil produced with modern day slavery, child labour, and worker and human rights abuses. Sacrificing the lives, health, and safety of the people who work on palm oil plantations is far too high a price to pay for the cheap palm oil used in snack foods made by companies like @PepsiCo. Please watch and share this short video to expose the truth. Thanks to our friends at Ecodeo (www.ecodeo.co) for producing this video.

Source: The Human Cost of Conflict Palm Oil – Rainforest Action Network

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15 Examples Jeremy Corbyn On Correct Side Of History

Jeremy Corbyn

1. Apartheid: Jeremy was a staunch opponent of the Apartheid regime and a supporter of Nelson Mandela and the ANC. He was even arrested for protesting outside the South African embassy in 1984.

2. Chile:
Jeremy was an opponent of the brutal dictator Pinochet (an ally of the British government under Thatcher) and was a leading campaigner in the quest to bring him to justice. In 1998 Pinochet was arrested in London.

3. LGBT rights:
As noted in Pink News, Jeremy was an early champion of LGBT rights. At a time when the Tories decried supporting LGBT rights as ‘loony left’, Jeremy voted against section 28 which sought to demonise same-sex relationships.

4. The Miners’ Strike:
Jeremy went against the Labour leadership and fully supported the miners in their effort to prevent the total destruction of their industry and communities. Cabinet papers released last year prove that the NUM were correct to claim that there was a secret hit list of 75 pits which the government were determined to close within 3 years. Ex-mining areas still suffer from the devastating effects of de-industrialisation, particularly high unemployment.

5. Iraq:
In the 1970s and 1980s, while the UK and other Western government were selling weapons to their ally Saddam Hussein, Jeremy campaigned and demonstrated against it, as well as protesting against the mass killings of Iraqi Kurds by Saddam’s regime.

6. Birmingham Six and Guildford Four:
Jeremy was involved in the campaigns in support of the victims of these appalling miscarriages of justice. The wrongful convictions were eventually quashed.

7. Talking to Sinn Fein:
 In the 1980s, along with Tony Benn and other Labour MPs, Jeremy drew intense criticism for engaging in dialogue with Sinn Fein and inviting its representatives to the House of Commons. The government claimed it ‘would not talk to terrorists’ but we now know that by 1989, it was secretly engaged in talks. Sinn Fein has been a major party of the Northern Ireland government since 1998 and even the Queen and Prince Charles have now met with its leading figures.

8. Tuition fees:
Jeremy opposed New Labour’s introduction of university tuition fees, which explicitly broke Labour’s 1997 election manifesto pledge, as well as all of the subsequent increases. Fees were then trebled under New Labour before being trebled again by the coalition government, leaving the average student in £53k of debt.

9. Private Finance Initiative (PFI):
Jeremy argued against this method of funding the building of new schools and hospitals, which was used partly because New Labour had committed itself to Tory spending plans. Instead of financing projects through government borrowing, private finance would build the infrastructure and then lease to the government. PFI deals cost the taxpayer £10bn a year and we will end up paying more than £300bn for assets worth just £54.7bn.

10. Afghanistan:
Going against the tide of political and public opinion in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, Jeremy opposed the invasion and occupation of Afghanistan in 2001. By 2009, most polls showed a majority of British people were against the war and Britain eventually withdrew its troops in October 2014.

11. Iraq, again:
Jeremy saw through the ‘dodgy dossier’, the claims of weapons of mass destruction and campaigned and voted against the Iraq war in 2003. In doing so, he helped to organise the biggest demonstration in British history and remains a leading figure in the Stop the War Coalition.

12. Palestine:
Jeremy has been a long-standing campaigner for the rights of the Palestinian people, beginning his advocacy at a time when Western public opinion was largely hostile to the Palestinian cause. Last year parliament overwhelmingly voted to recognise Palestine.

13. Public ownership of the railways:
Jeremy has always advocated public ownership of our railways. The argument that privatisation would result in competition and thus lower fares has been proved to be entirely incorrect. Instead not only have fares rocketed year on year but the British taxpayer now subsidies the railways to the tune of £4bn a year, around four times the cost of  the previous, publicly owned system.

14. Trident:
 Jeremy has been a long-term campaigner in CND, and has always opposed Britain having nuclear weapons – a difficult argument to make at the height of the Cold War. But now virtually all the polling evidence shows that a majority of people are against spending £100bn on a new generation of Trident nuclear weapons.

15. Austerity:
Right from the beginning Jeremy argued and campaigned against austerity. Despite inheriting a situation where the economy was growing, Osborne’s austerity budgets plunged the UK into a double dip recession in April 2012 and by February 2013 Britain lost its AAA credit rating for the first time since the late 1970s. Five years of austerity later and the UK’s debt has actually risen from £1trn in 2010 to around £1.5trn today. The social cost has been shocking, leading to a rise in child poverty, an unprecedented fall in real wages and nearly 1 million people now reliant on food banks to name but a few of the dire consequences.

Source: The World Turned Upside Down: Radical thinking from the North East
15 times when Jeremy Corbyn was on the right side of history

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Posted in Politics, Protest | Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Matthew Edwards and the Unfortunates

Matthew Edwards and The Unfortunates Live at the Hare & Hounds Birmingham Poster

Matthew Edwards and the Unfortunates (as heard on Dandelion Radio, The Shed and the BBC) are playing a special gig at the Hare And Hounds in Birmingham with support from Earthling Society, Friday April 10th.

Matthew says, “This is our first major Birmingham show of the year and what a terrific bill it is. We are joined by Lancashire’s finest krautrock exponents Earthling Society and Swordfish Records esteemed Swordfish Sound System. This will be our only B’ham performance for a while as we are going walkabout (recording, London, festivals) for the Summer. It’s only 6 quid and Earthling Society open the night at 9PM.”

Update:
On the same day (April 10) Matthew Edwards will be appearing live on the Adrian Goldberg show on BBC WM at 8.45AM. On BBC iPlayer now – fast forward to 1hr 49mins 09secs to hear Matthew chat and perform a solo acoustic version of The English Blues.

The Fates by Matthew Edwards And The Unfortunates is available from
Metal Postcard Records, iTunes and limited vinyl edition from Darla.


Matthew Edwards & The Unfortunates Links:
Website | Blog | facebook | facebook Event Page | YouTube | soundcloud | Reviews

Posted in Music | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

New Adam Curtis Film ‘Bitter Lake’ Trailer

Trailer for Bitter Lake by Adam Curtis

Politicians used to have the confidence to tell us stories that made sense of the chaos of world events.

But now there are no big stories and politicians react randomly to every new crisis – leaving us bewildered and disorientated.

And journalism – that used to tell a grand, unfurling narrative – now also just relays disjointed and often wildly contradictory fragments of information.

Events come and go like waves of a fever. We – and the journalists – live in a state of continual delirium, constantly waiting for the next news event to loom out of the fog – and then disappear again, unexplained.

And the formats – in news and documentaries – have become so rigid and repetitive that the audiences never really look at them.

In the face of this people retreat from journalism and politics. They turn away into their own worlds, and the stories they and their friends tell each other.

I think this is wrong, sad, and bad for democracy – because it means the politicians become more and more unaccountable.

I have made a film that tries to respond to this in two ways.

It tells a big story about why the stories we are told today have stopped making sense.

But it is also an experiment in a new way of reporting the world. To do this I’ve used techniques that you wouldn’t normally associate with TV journalism. My aim is to make something more emotional and involving – so it reconnects and feels more real.

BBC iPlayer has given me the opportunity to do this – because it isn’t restrained by the rigid formats and schedules of network television. It’s a place you can go to experiment and try out new ideas.

It is also liberating – both because things can be any length, and also because it allows the audience to watch the films in different ways.

The film is called Bitter Lake. It is a bit of an epic – it’s two hours twenty minutes long.

Continue reading Adam Curtis’ post and watch the trailer here
Adam Curtis
http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/adamcurtis/posts/TRAILER-TRASH

Posted in Documentary, Journalism, Media, Politics, Television | Tagged , , , , ,